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Pioneer Post Volume 10, Number 3

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Date Issued:
1969-11-13
Summary:
This Pioneer Post (also known as Pioneer Press) edition contains articles about student life, local performances, and sports scores. Articles of note include:
  • An editorial, produced by a former IRJC student, tackles a conspiracy theory regarding Paul McCartney. Rumors circling his death have incited an investigation to determine if The Beatles member is still alive. Due to the immense following The Beatles have acquired during this time period, many young adults have devoted their time to coming up with conclusions. In the 1960s, The Beatles became an international sensation that appealed to young Americans (particularly young women). Their fame led to many obsessive followers creating rumors about their personal lives. One rumor in particular circled around the possible death of Paul McCartney. People began to vigorously search for clues that could indicate a “deceased Paul” in The Beatle’s music, causing a frenzy. Multiple conspiracy theories emerged including hidden messages in songs played backwards, symbolism in their album artwork, etc. This popularity reflected how influential The Beatles were during this time period where young Americans were rebellious towards traditional authority. This also shows how it is human nature to want simplistic answers that match our own worldviews.
  • An opinion editorial, written by former IRJC student, Cary Brunswick, discusses a debate between the use of alcohol and marijuana during this time. Alcohol was widely accepted on college campuses, while marijuana use created controversy. Brunswick also talks about the effects each substance has on the human body, and calls for an "evaluation of judgement". Throughout the 1960s, many Americans began to experiment with new drugs such as marijuana and hallucinogens. Marijuana use was heavily criticized for its effects on the human body (and on human behavior). Since the 1960s was a time when young Americans rebelled against authority and the Vietnam War, marijuana use became more popular. The debate, which still stands today, poses the question: is marijuana really that much worse than alcohol?
  • "Are You a Hippie?" An opinion editorial, written by former IRJC student Cary Brunswick, discusses what it means to be a "beatnik hippie". The article attempts to identify the difference between hippie behavior and hippie style. In the 1960s, the “hippie movement” emerged as a result of rebellion against social norms (especially due to American involvement in Vietnam). Hippies followed their own beliefs and ideals. Some of these ideals included shifting the media’s focus from “minute” issues (such as cleanliness and personal hygiene) to larger societal problems (including poverty, racial discrimination, law enforcement, etc.). Hippies were nonconformists in their thinking, their “free” and often rebellious lifestyles, and their protests against traditional American culture.
Summary and historical context written by Marie Grandguillotte, in Dr. Carrigan's AMH 2020 H2SL (Honors/Service Learning).
Title: Pioneer Post Volume 10, Number 3.
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Name(s): Indian River State College
Type of Resource: text
Issuance: serial
Date Issued: 1969-11-13
Publisher: Indian River State College
Place of Publication: Fort Pierce, Florida
Extent: 17''x 11'' Newspaper print
Language(s): English
Summary: This Pioneer Post (also known as Pioneer Press) edition contains articles about student life, local performances, and sports scores. Articles of note include:
  • An editorial, produced by a former IRJC student, tackles a conspiracy theory regarding Paul McCartney. Rumors circling his death have incited an investigation to determine if The Beatles member is still alive. Due to the immense following The Beatles have acquired during this time period, many young adults have devoted their time to coming up with conclusions. In the 1960s, The Beatles became an international sensation that appealed to young Americans (particularly young women). Their fame led to many obsessive followers creating rumors about their personal lives. One rumor in particular circled around the possible death of Paul McCartney. People began to vigorously search for clues that could indicate a “deceased Paul” in The Beatle’s music, causing a frenzy. Multiple conspiracy theories emerged including hidden messages in songs played backwards, symbolism in their album artwork, etc. This popularity reflected how influential The Beatles were during this time period where young Americans were rebellious towards traditional authority. This also shows how it is human nature to want simplistic answers that match our own worldviews.
  • An opinion editorial, written by former IRJC student, Cary Brunswick, discusses a debate between the use of alcohol and marijuana during this time. Alcohol was widely accepted on college campuses, while marijuana use created controversy. Brunswick also talks about the effects each substance has on the human body, and calls for an "evaluation of judgement". Throughout the 1960s, many Americans began to experiment with new drugs such as marijuana and hallucinogens. Marijuana use was heavily criticized for its effects on the human body (and on human behavior). Since the 1960s was a time when young Americans rebelled against authority and the Vietnam War, marijuana use became more popular. The debate, which still stands today, poses the question: is marijuana really that much worse than alcohol?
  • "Are You a Hippie?" An opinion editorial, written by former IRJC student Cary Brunswick, discusses what it means to be a "beatnik hippie". The article attempts to identify the difference between hippie behavior and hippie style. In the 1960s, the “hippie movement” emerged as a result of rebellion against social norms (especially due to American involvement in Vietnam). Hippies followed their own beliefs and ideals. Some of these ideals included shifting the media’s focus from “minute” issues (such as cleanliness and personal hygiene) to larger societal problems (including poverty, racial discrimination, law enforcement, etc.). Hippies were nonconformists in their thinking, their “free” and often rebellious lifestyles, and their protests against traditional American culture.
Summary and historical context written by Marie Grandguillotte, in Dr. Carrigan's AMH 2020 H2SL (Honors/Service Learning).
Identifier: irsc_c_pp_0004 (IID)
Subject(s): McCartney, Paul--Death hoax -- Marijuana -- Alcohol -- Saint Lucie County (Fla.) -- 21st century
Held by: Indian River State College Archives
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/irsc/fd/irsc_c_pp_0004
Use and Reproduction: Owned by Indian River State College
Host Institution: IRSC